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Crimson Peak #FilmReview ‘Jane Austin with a dash of Mary Shelley’
November 26, 2017, 7:00 pm
Filed under: Film Reviews | Tags: , , ,

Crimson Peak (MA15+)
2015, Thriller, 1hr 58mins.
Starring: Mia Wasikowska, Jessica Chastain and Tom Hiddleston
Crimson Peak is currently available for mobile cinema events

Synopsis
In the aftermath of a family tragedy, an aspiring author is torn between love for her childhood friend and the temptation of a mysterious outsider. Trying to escape the ghosts of her past, she is swept away to a house that breathes, bleeds… and remembers. – via Letterboxd

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Review
Guillermo Del Toro the director behind the brilliant ‘Pan’s Labyrinth’, ‘The Devil’s Backbone’ and the OK blockbuster ‘Pacific Rim’ returns with Crimson Peak’ that thankfully falls more on the brilliant side of his catalogue rather than the blockbuster. He takes your classic haunted house story, adds some Jane Austin, some over the top art direction and a brilliant cast to give us a creepy ghost story that opts for ‘story’ instead of scares. That said many of the ghostly moments were extremely creepy and managed to give me goosebumps on more than one occasion. This is aided by an unnerving soundscape that puts you on edge, and is enough to make a turning door knob truly terrifying. This isn’t to say that ‘Crimson Peak’ isn’t without it’s gore, as anyone who has seen ‘Pan’s Labyrinth’ knows that Del Toro uses violence sparingly. But when an act of violence does occur it is always shocking, and horrific and ‘Crimson Peak’ is no exception.

Del Toro with his growing back catalogue of ghostly creature features riffs on his previous creations, ghosts that bleed zero gravity blood, much like ‘The Devil’s Backbone’. The moths that seem to be inexplicably growing in numbers linking to his earlier work on ‘Mimic’. And the facial violence of ‘Pan’s Labyrinth’ is definitely in your face here as well. The one thing that took me out of the movie was the heavy handed art department, that turned the house into a living, breathing and bleeding character in the film, it was beautiful and every frame of the film is worthy of wall space in a gallery. But it felt like a film set, rather than a habitable space.

Horror fans that are after loads of jump scares and gross outs will most probably be disappointed. But if you like Jane Austin with a dash of Mary Shelley with some creepy chills thrown in, ’Crimson Peak’ should be the haunted house for you.

Rating ★★★★ out of ★★★★★

Crimson Peak is currently available for Road Movie Mobile Cinema events. Please contact us for a film copyright quote for your next pop-up outdoor or indoor cinema event in South Australia or Victoria

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High-Rise #FilmReview ‘the director runs wild along with the residents’
May 11, 2017, 5:00 pm
Filed under: Film Reviews | Tags: , , ,

High-Rise (2015)
Drama, Rated MA15+, 119 Minutes.
Starring: Tom Hiddleston, Jeremy Irons, Sienna Miller
Now available for mobile cinema events

Synopsis
Life for the residents of a tower block begins to run out of control.

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Review
J. G. Ballard’s Novel High-Rise has been a passion project for producer Jeremy Thomas since its release in 1975. Purchasing the rights to what many claimed was an unfilmable novel Thomas would finally see his dream become reality forty years later.

Director Ben Wheatley (Free Fire, A Field In England and Sightseers) finally commits this disturbing dystopian vision of the past – the 70’s – to the big screen. Was it unfilmable? No. Did it make a whole lot of sense? No. Not that there is a lot to get your head around, the story is a straight up parable that constantly slaps you across the face to make sure you’re following. That’s right, poor people on the floors below, rich people up top and even a man on the top floor all dressed in white called the architect – sigh.

This is not to say the same subject matter can’t be entertaining. Director Bong Joon-Ho masterfully pulled off an almost identical plot with the film Snowpiercer released two years prior. With the director creating an inventive, thrilling, and – most importantly – highly watchable and re-watchable film. High-Rise is hard going, mainly for it’s violence towards its female characters and live-in pets.

In fact I had to tackle this film in two goes. The only reason I came back was the brilliant soundtrack from Clint Mansell who managed to add a stylish 70’s styled score. As well as the breathtaking cinematography from Laurie Rose, a regular collaborator with Wheatley.

If ultra-violence is your thing, you’ve come to the right address, but if you would like something else in your abode, like plot or narrative structure this isn’t the building for you. And speaking of ultra violence the poster draws an uncanny resemblance to the Kubrick classic ‘Clockwork Orange’, a film that was obviously a massive influence on the production.

At 2hrs long it feels like the director runs wild along with the residents and completely forgets the people on the ground floor – the audience.

Rating ★★      out of ★★★★★

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Eye in the Sky (M) ★★★1/2 Now available for mobile cinema events #ReleaseOfTheWeek
July 20, 2016, 7:45 am
Filed under: Release of the week | Tags: , , , ,

Release Of The Week! Eye in the Sky
2015, Drama/Thriller/War, Rated M, 102 Minutes.
Starring: Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul, Alan Rickman
A military officer in command of a drone operation to capture terrorists in Kenya sees her mission escalate from “capture” to “kill” just as a nine-year old girl enters the kill zone. Available 20 July – Outdoor from 20 September 2016 (TBC)

'This really is a fantastically constructed film in that it intercuts multiple locations around the world without ever losing focus or intensity. It's easily the best film about drone warfare yet, although I'm not sure the great film on that subject has yet to be made.'– To read the ★★★1/2 review by Brian Tallerico on Letterboxd click on the poster above

‘This really is a fantastically constructed film in that it intercuts multiple locations around the world without ever losing focus or intensity. It’s easily the best film about drone warfare yet, although I’m not sure the great film on that subject has yet to be made.’– To read the ★★★1/2 review by Brian Tallerico on Letterboxd click on the poster above




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